FG says Madagascar herb can’t cure COVID-19

FG says Madagascar herb can’t cure COVID-19

- The federal government has discredited reports claiming that the Madagascar COVID-19 herb can effectively cure coronavirus

- NIPRD in a statement said analysis has shown that the Madagascan herb does not alter the normal physiology of animals

- The institute stated that the herb contains artemisia annua as one of the components

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The federal government has said findings have shown that the Madagascar COVID-19 organics cannot cure coronavirus.

The National Institute of Pharmaceutical Research and Development (NIPRD) in a report on Sunday, July 19, disclosed that scientific analysis of the herb showed that it is not as potent as claimed, The Cable reported.

FG says Madagascar herb can’t cure COVID-19

The federal government has said analysis has shown that the Madagascar COVID-19 herb cannot cure coronavirus. Credits: Photo collage sourced from Daily Trust/Twitter
Source: UGC

According to the federal government agency, studies showed that the herb does not alter the normal physiology of animals.

The director-general of NIPR, Dr. Obi Adigwe, said the herb which contains mainly Artemisia annua, works to reduce the frequency of cough with maximum dose, producing an effect equivalent to that produced by the centrally acting cough-suppressant, dihydrocodeine.

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Part of the report by the agency read: “COVID ORGANICS – Green Pack (GPA) and Orange Pack (OPB) herbal products contain Artemisia annua as one of the components. Both samples have the characteristic features of Artemisia annua similar to those of the plant grown in NIPRD.

“COVID ORGANICS (OPB and GPA) contain other plants in addition to Artemisia annua. The proportion of Artemisia annua in the product is higher than that of the other plant component(s).

“Unlike the impression created by the labelling, the two COVID ORGANICS products are not the same with GPA sweeter with a higher extractive value than OPB. The HPLC and TLC profile of COVID ORGANICS products indicated the presence of artemisinin.

“Artemisinin was detected in the hot water infusion of the COVID ORGANICS products at a very low concentration and undetectable in one of the products. Hence, preparing the infusion as directed on the label produced very little artemisinin.

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“Safety studies show that COVID ORGANICS (CVO) products do not alter the normal physiology of animals.

The agency, however, said it has prepared its own product which is likely to be ready for presentation within the next six months.

“There is one product we have that is having a lot of promise," the agency said.

Meanwhile, a worrying trend has surfaced in the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) as hospitals in the city are rejecting patients over the fear of the coronavirus pandemic.

A report by Premium Times detailed the complaints of many residents of the city who have been rejected by hospitals over Covid-19 fears.

According to the report, Simon Agagwu, a 70-year-old man suffering from breathing complications, died on Sunday, June 28, after he was reportedly rejected by at least three public hospitals.

The deceased's family said he had battled strokes for almost 16 years and was also hypertensive. Legit.ng gathers that Agagwu received treatment at the Federal Medical Centre (FMC) in Lokoja, Kogi state until the facility was closed down due to Covid-19 fears.

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He was then moved to Abuja to resume treatment on the advice of his doctors.

After being rejected by three hospitals, Agagwu was accepted by the Federal Medical Centre (FMC) Jabi but he was also not given treatment immediately.

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Coronavirus: Does the Madagascar cure really work? | Legit TV

Source: Legit

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