NIDCOM celebrates the first black woman to bag a PhD in aerospace engineering

NIDCOM celebrates the first black woman to bag a PhD in aerospace engineering

- Nigerians are celebrating their own genius in the person of Dr Wendy Okolo

- Dr Okolo is the first black woman to bag a PhD in Aerospace Engineering

- She and other Nigerians are making the country proud with their contributions to the international organisations they find themselves

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The Nigerian in Diaspora Commission (NIDCOM) has celebrated Dr Wendy Okolo, who is the first black woman to bag a PhD in Aerospace Engineering.

The Nigerian-born woman bagged her doctorate degree from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Legit.ng gathers that Dr Okolo is an aerospace research engineer in the Intelligent Systems Division at NASA Ames Research Center.

NIDCOM Celebrates Dr Okolo, The First Black Woman To Bag A PhD In Aerospace Engineering

Dr Wendy Okolo. Photo credit: African Vibes Magazine
Source: UGC

Dr Okolo, who was born to a family of six has taken off her career at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), a United States agency responsible for the civilian space program as well as aeronautics and aerospace research.

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According to her biography on NASA, she achieved both her bachelors degree and doctorate degree from the University of Texas at Arlington in 2010 and 2015 respectively.

She was only 26 when she became the first black woman to get a doctorate degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Legit.ng previously reported that Dr Okolo was honoured as a distinguished recent graduate at her alma mater, the University of Texas at Arlington.

Okolo who studied at the university between 2010 and 2015 was recognised for her great strides after graduating from the school.

In other news, a Nigerian man identified as Adewale Adeniyi has inspired many people on LinkedIn with his grass to grace story.

Adeniyi said he worked as a roadside mechanic for six months without being paid during his undergraduate years at the higher institution where he studied engineering.

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He said bailing oneself out of the less privileged circle is by showcasing "uncommon knowledge", adding that one becomes irresistible by doing so.

Adeniyi shared a picture in which he was flanked by two roadside mechanics to show his humble beginning.

He said: "I like sharing this picture because it reminds me of a time I worked with roadside mechanics as a University Engineering Student for 6 months and was never paid a kobo. I felt cheated but what I learned was priceless.

"Today I tell my mechanic what to fix and replace. I troubleshoot and do the mental work. I save some cash there."

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Source: Legit.ng

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