Meet the Only Eight Nigerian Medical Doctors in the 19th Century, they Were All Outstanding

Meet the Only Eight Nigerian Medical Doctors in the 19th Century, they Were All Outstanding

More Nigerians are embracing the medical profession in recent times in a bid to save lives and make the world a better place. Many are, however, unaware that there were just eight Nigerian medical doctors in the nineteenth century.

Courtesy of My Engineers, Legit.ng presents the only eight Nigerian medical doctors in the nineteenth century (1800s)

The men were the only Nigerian medical doctors in the nineteenth century
William Broughton Davies and seven others were the only Nigerian medical doctors in the nineteenth century. Photo credit: My Engineers
Source: UGC

1.William Broughton Davies (1833-1906)

William Broughton Davies was born in Sierra Leone to Yoruba ex-slaves. Davies was trained as medical doctor in the United Kingdom.

After his training, he moved to Scotland where he obtained his MD in 1858 by examination from Edinburgh University in 1859.

2 James Africanus Beale Horton (1835-1883)

Like Davies, Horton's parents were also ex-slaves but of Igbo descent. He also trained as medical doctor in the United Kingdom

He moved to Scotland after his training and obtained his MD in 1859 by a thesis from Edinburgh University.

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3. Nathaniel King (1847-1884)

Nathaniel King was born of Yoruba parents in Sierra Leone into the family of Rev. Thomas King. He was the first Nigerian to practice modern medicine in his own country.

King was one of the four students of the first-ever medical school in Nigeria. He proceeded to the United Kingdom for further medical training.

In 1874, he became M.R.C.S of England at King’s College, London, after which he obtained M.B., C.M. in 1876 and the M.D. in 1979 in Edinburgh.

4. Obadiah Johnson (1849-1920)

Obadiah Johnson was born in Sierra Leone. He got a B.A. degree from Fourah Bay College in 1879 and proceeded to King’s College to obtain the M.R.C.S. and the L.S.A. in 1884.

He was awarded M.D of Edinburgh University after submitting a thesis on West African therapeutics in 1889

5. John Randle (1855-1928)

Randle was born in Sierra Leone and his father was an ex-Yoruba slave. He graduated from Edinburgh University in 1888 with M.B. and C.M.

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6. George Stone Smith (1863-1940)

George Stone Smith who later changed his name to Orisadipe Obasa was born in Sierra Leone. His father was the son of Elekole of Ikole-Ekiti and his mother was from the royal family of Akija of Ikija in Abeokuta.

Obasa was sent to King’s College, Taunton, and later St. Thomas’s Hospital Medical School, London, where he obtained M.R.C.S. and L.R.C.P. in 1891.

7. Sodeinde Akinsiku Leigh-Sodipe (1865-1901)

Sodeinde Akinsiku Leigh-Sodipe was the first Nigerian doctor with an African or Nigerian name. He was born in Lagos and attended the College of Medicine, Newcastle upon Tyne, and obtained the M.B. degree of Durham University in 1892.

8. Alexander Williams (1861-1935)

Alexander Williams later known as Oguntola Odunbaku Sapara was born in Sierra Leone. His father was a freed slave originally from Ilesha in Osun state and his mother was from Egbaland.

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Sapara obtained honours in midwifery from St. Thomas’s Hospital Medical School, London, in 1888 and obtained the L.R.C.P. and L.R.C.S. of Edinburgh, the L.F.P.S. of Glasgow in 1895.

Source: Legit

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