Fabiana Pierre-Louis becomes 1st black female Supreme Court justice in New Jersey

Fabiana Pierre-Louis becomes 1st black female Supreme Court justice in New Jersey

- After over 22 decades, the first black female justice in New Jersey Supreme Court has been sworn-in

- Thirty-nine-year-old Fabiana Pierre-Louis was sworn-in on Tuesday, September 1

- The woman says to be a Supreme Court justice is a dream come true for her

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A 39-year-old woman identified as Fabiana Pierre-Louis has been sworn-in as the newest member of the New Jersey Supreme Court.

Fabiana becomes the first black female justice in the state’s 224-year-history and the youngest to ever occupy that position, How Africa reports.

Legit.ng gathers that the woman is the daughter of Haitian immigrants whose father was a taxi driver in New York.

Fabiana, whose mother worked for several years at the Manhattan hospital, said to be a Supreme Court justice is a dream come true for her.

In her words: “Many years ago, my parents came to the United States from Haiti with not much more than the clothes on their backs and the American dream in their hearts.

“I think they have achieved that dream beyond measure because my life is certainly not representative of the traditional trajectory of someone who would one day be nominated to the Supreme Court of New Jersey.”

Pierre-Louis becomes 1st black female Supreme Court justice in New Jersey

Fabiana Pierre-Louis. Photo credit: WHYY
Source: UGC

Governor Phil Murphy, who nominated Fabiana for the position back in June before it was unanimously confirmed by the Senate, said she was chosen based on merit.

According to him, history has been made.

It should be noted that African-Americans have made history in the United States and are still making history in the North American country.

Thurgood Marshall was one of those that did not leave the surface of the earth without making history.

Marshall was a lawyer who served as an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from October 1967 to October 1991.

The lawyer, who was instrumental in ending legal segregation in the United States, was the first African-American to serve on the nation's highest court.

In 1954, Marshal won the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka case, in which the Supreme Court ended racial segregation in public schools.

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