Meet Nancy Adams the 'disabled' black woman who escaped slavery three times

Meet Nancy Adams the 'disabled' black woman who escaped slavery three times

- Nancy Adams was a black slave who walked with a limp but succeeded in escaping slavery 3 different times in her lifetime

- The relentless woman who lived between 1766 and 1859 had three kids and usually escaped with them

- Nancy escaped slavery once in Maryland and twice in Connecticut

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Nancy Adams, an iconic black slave who was born in 1766 and died in June 1859 left a remarkable but hardly known footprint of escaping slavery three times in her lifetime.

According to a report by Face 2 Face Africa sighted by Legit.ng, Nancy escaped slavery once in Maryland and twice in Connecticut, even though she walked with a limp.

After all her expeditions, Nancy later settled down in Uxbridge, Massachusetts, where she lived as a free woman for many years before her death on June 6, 1859.

Meet Nancy Adams the 'disabled' black woman who escaped slavery three times

Source: UGC
Source: UGC

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The first time Nancy fled slavery was after she got married at 17 and had two sons and a daughter. She had been told that her slave owner planned on selling her and her children to the “Spaniards,” which made her escape with her family into the woods.

Five months after that, they came out and worked on a cotton plantation for more than 23 years after which Adams' new owner took her to be sold after a trip to Norwich, Connecticut, where she escaped for the second time.

For 12 years, she lived in Norwich until she learnt that her former slave owner was aware of where she was and planned to recapture her. Thus, she fled for the third and last time to Uxbridge where she lived until her death.

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Harriet Tubman: Her powerful story and journey to freedom from slavery

In other news, 32 years after surviving the Piper Alpha oil rig explosion, Steve Rae has taken to social media to reflect on the unfortunate incident of July 6, 1988.

Rae said 12 hours after arriving at work on that fateful, he found himself struggling to find a route to safety, running from a raging inferno.

On his LinkedIn page, Rae said the struggle quickly became about survival rather than reaching a safe place.

He wrote: "I got lucky that night and by the grace of God made it off, tragically 165 Never did."

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Source: Legit.ng News

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