Charity Salima: Midwife champion who delivers women with little resources

Charity Salima: Midwife champion who delivers women with little resources

- Madam Charity Salima, the owner of Achikondi Women's Clinic, is a saviour to many expected mothers in Malawi

- With her 24 hours midwifery service, Salima renders help to women of little means

- The kind midwife said she is offering the act of kindness because it is her call to do so

Madam Charity Salima is one of the few saviours in the world, giving care to the helpless, and refreshing the hope of many who are at the brink of giving up.

She is a midwife in Malawi and the owner of Achikondi Women’s Clinic in Area 23. Salima said the first very baby she delivered was in 2002 on a late and rainy night, Aljazeera reports.

The midwife claimed the parents of the new baby had no transportation to get to the hospital, which was the reason why they called for her services.

Even though she had to rely on very limited resources, she still did a wonderful job. From then onward, the savior-midwife said she realized it is what she wants to give her passion to.

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"The very first baby I delivered was in 2002, it was very late in the night and it was raining heavily.

"The woman and her husband never had transportation to go to the hospital so they decided to call me. Even though I never had the resources, I managed to deliver a baby girl. From that moment, I knew that this was a calling."

One of the best things about Salima’s clinic, is that it runs round the clock, offering services 24 hours to pregnant women who may need it at any time. The clinic employed the hands of just three nurses, making four with the inputs of Salima.

Her hospital relies on donations. Some of those donations have helped in the provision of the vehicle that she uses to transport her patients.

Some of her benefactors for the clinic are the National Organisation of Nurses, the Freedom from Fistula Foundation, Nurses in Scotland, among others.

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Charity Salima with one of her patients at the clinic. Photo credit: Aljazeera

Charity Salima with one of her patients at the clinic. Photo credit: Aljazeera
Source: UGC

The United Kingdom recently celebrated Salima’s act of humanity with a Common point of Light Award.

On her hope for the future, especially in the area of helping pregnant women, Salami said she intends to open more maternal health clinics in communities and townships.

"My hope is to open more maternal health clinics in communities and townships because people from such areas are not closer to such medical care,” she said.

Salima was born in the 1950s and was single-handedly raised by her grandmother despite the fact that she was financially challenged.

In 1980, she studied nursing and midwifery and worked as a nurse at Queen Elizabeth Central. She has helped so many women during the course of her career.

Glory Honde is one of her beneficiaries who praised her to high heavens, saying that she was cared for during and after delivery as if she was at home.

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"I never expected Madam Charity Salima to take such good care of me. I stayed here for three days but it didn't feel like I was at a clinic whatsoever.

"It felt like I was home, she treated me like I was her own daughter, that's how well she took care of me," she said.

Recall that Legit.ng reported that Adepeju Jaiyeoba was honoured by the US embassy in Nigeria for her contribution in reducing mortality rate among pregnant women.

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Source: Legit Newspaper

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